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Author Topic: Mikedemana's aerial screw (not a Mile Hile Club reference!)  (Read 2155 times)
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Dr Mathias
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« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2017, 06:17:02 PM »

Great project, I love Da Vinci's designs. He's a hero of mine! I really like your approach.

Several years ago when I was getting into egg tempera paintings I painted a small one (about 8 inches high) that had the aerial screw. So preposterous Smiley

« Last Edit: February 01, 2017, 01:53:27 AM by Dr Mathias » Logged

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« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2017, 12:43:05 AM »

She's looking rather elegant i must say.
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mikedemana
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« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2017, 05:37:23 AM »


The Aerial Screw (sans screws, so far... Laugh)

Thanks, guys! I appreciate the encouragement.

More progress. I worked for a few hours last night, and a couple more tonight. The most noticeable change is that I painted the central shaft and the gun platform gears Steel, highlighting it with Gun Metal. I picked out some of shaft gears with copper paint to make it stand out more. I also jazzed up the wheel gears on the outside with some silver and copper paint, and a nice bead for the axle cover.


I go crazy when it comes to metallic beads, and love using them to look like machinery

When I lopped off an inch or so from the central shaft, it messed up my plans for some of the metallic beads I'd bought. I had originally planned to have various beads around the cylinder on the bottom. It was much shorter, now. I had to find new ways to jazz up the assembly and make it look suitably steampunkish (or Victorian Sci-Fi, if you prefer that term). I really like these gold beads and since they wouldn't work in the new bottom configuration of the shaft (sounds dirty  Cheesy), I decided to mount a row of them on this flywheel. I epoxied them into place, then put a copper bead on top. That wasn't enough, in my mind, so I topped them off with the head of a straight pin. I decorated the base of the central shaft with a ring of alternating copper and hematite beads. I simply squirted tacky glue around the shaft and pushed the beads into place. By the way, I had no idea hematite beads were magnetic when I bought them...!  Laugh


The gun platform with the gears painted, the wheel decorated, and the skeleton of the gangway connecting it to the main base

Instead of going to bed when I should have, I stayed up and decorated the central shaft so more. I glued more shiny copper beads around part of it. I may yet fill their holes with pin heads or something similar. I wanted to some more 3D decoration on them. Epoxying the beads onto a cylindrical surface, and was a pain. I solved it by generous uses of bluetack to hold the model in place so the beads sat flat.


The central shaft assembly with its silver rivets painted on... Confused

When I came home today, the first thing I did was paint silver rivets on the curved surfaces of the central shaft assembly. I am not 100% satisfied with my hand steadiness and artistry with the brush. I hope that as more details get added in my less-than-straight rows of dots will fade into the background. This is a 15m scale model, and the central shaft was simply too small to use 3D rivets, IMO. Afterwards, I thought maybe I could have figured something out with straight pins with tiny disc-like heads, but honestly, I am kind of making this up as I go along!  Laugh


A frontal view of the model

The next job today was to construct the framework of the bridge leading from the main base to the gun platform. I'd constructed the pieces previously. Now, it was a time to make the arc of the bridge. I used some wood to hold the first end piece at the proper angle while the epoxy dried. Next, I epoxied the other end piece in place pointing upward at its angle. I prayed that I didn't space them too far apart. Once they were dry, I glued the double-length central part of the bridge frame onto the ends. Whew! It fit well. Once it was all dry and solid, I trimmed a piece of paper until it matched exactly the size of the bridge frame. The paper became my template to cut out a piece of window screen to resemble a metal mesh surface for the bridge. I lined the upper part of the bridge frame with epoxy and simply pressed the screen down onto it.


I'm calling these, Dalek-like 3-bead constructions the "power stacks"

The final step of the evening was to prep the power stacks -- 4 large conical beads that look for all the world like Dr. Who Daleks. They feature 8 columns of button-like projections, which I envision as power read-outs on for the engine. I painted the four larger columns varying levels of red/yellow/green. Before that, I dug through my bead collection and found flower-like beads to epoxy atop the dalek beads. Next, I used copper eyepins and a shiny copper bead to top them off. The idea is that the four will sit in a half arc behind the central shaft. The loops atop the four will be connected by wire, which will be strung with tiny golden beads. That's the plan -- we'll see tomorrow if it works out!

Mike Demana
www.firstcommandwargames.com
http://leadlegionaries.blogspot.com/









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nervisfr
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« Reply #18 on: February 04, 2017, 08:40:21 AM »

Hey mike,
I m happy to see you there, in an another aera than woodland  Laugh

Like you work nd your painting too.
Excellent use of  bits and pieces from different origin.

Cheers Eric
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« Reply #19 on: February 04, 2017, 09:55:05 AM »

Fascinating.  Shocked
And so intricate  Cool

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Instead of going to bed when I should have
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mikedemana
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« Reply #20 on: February 04, 2017, 04:23:25 PM »


The flying machine at this stage. You can see the powerstacks are completed and strung, while work on the bridge has begun.

A couple more days, a good bit of progress. If you've noticed, I have not started on the "screw" part of the flying machine. I am still not 100% satisfied with my idea for it, so am waiting for new inspiration to strike. However, the rest of the machine draws closer and closer to completion. I am liking how the ideas are coming to fruition, too. With each stage, I'm more pleased with its look.


The "tool" and the length of wire being threaded with the tiny 11/0 gold beads

When I left off, I had just painted the "powerstacks" -- those four Dalek-like beads -- with columns of green, yellow, and red buttons. To give them a firm seating, I first glued washers to the copper fabric of the base. I am using Tacky glue for things to attach things to the fabric because I think it will soak into its fibers more (and hopefully hold better) than epoxy. Then I used epoxy to glue the beads to the metal washers. Next up was what I felt would be one of the more difficult parts. I wanted to string together the powerstacks with wire lined with bright gold beads. These are beads are tiny, 11/0 it says on the label. I knew I would struggle to pick them up and thread them onto a wire. So, I created a "tool" -- hey, it IS what separates us from the animals, right?  Laugh


A close up of the powerstacks with their length of wire strung with beads connecting their tops

The tool was simply a length of thick, piano wire with a tiny blob of bluetack on it. I lightly tough the bead with the bluetack, which picks it up, then move it to the wire and carefully thread it onto it. I slid each bead down the wire as it went on. I also put a fancy, golden globe bead at the beginning and end of each string of tiny gold beads. Once I had the right length or distance between the powerstacks on the wire, I would paint the wire with epoxy and slide the beads down onto it. The tricky part was then re-threading the wire through the next copper eyelet atop the next powerstack in line. I was worried it would involve too much force and tear something loose, but I was careful, and the process worked like a charm!


The "book" beads that will form the bridge and stairs leading to it upside down, with their spools and half-spools attached tot their bottom

The next thing to begin work on was the bridge. I had purchased a 15mm ship's wheel at the local hobby store. I dug through my collecting and found a figure with both arms in the air that would work as a helmsmen. I wanted the bridge to be a raised platform, but honestly had not sketched anything out, yet. I first plunked some small wooden cubes onto the base, but immediately felt it did not fit with the Victorian Sci-Fi/Steampunk theme. I pulled out my boxes of bits and beads and worked my way through it until I saw the bag of square beads I'd bought long ago to use as 25mm books or tomes. Hmmm. I placed a few on the deck and was impressed with how they seemed perfect for the them. I also liked the idea of a staircase leading up to the bridge, so came up with the idea of slowly elevating a row of these. I found some small, wooden thread spools in my collection and they were the perfect size. I cut one in half to provide an intermediate step, and used two full size ones for the bridge platform. Beads with no spools would be the bottom steps.


The bridge, which will have a helmsman steering the vessel with a ship's wheel

I painted the spools Iron Wind Metals "Steel" -- one of my all-time, favorite paints. I then used Iron Wind's Antique Bronze for stripes and decorations so that the spools would match the beads I was using for the steps and bridge platform. I know the contest isn't supposed to feature pictures of the finished, painted model, but I had to paint these before gluing them down. In fact, the picture above doesn't even have them glued down yet. They are simply placed on the base so I could see what they're going to look like completed.


The wheel shaft -- 3 globe beads and a gear bad -- and the wheel itself drilled out and a straight pin ready to be glued

The next stage would be to construct the wheel shaft. I had to wait until the bridge was complete, so that I would make it the correct height. I took a length of aluminum rod and secured it between books horizontally. I slid 3 larger, fancy golden globe beads and one of the "gear" beads I used on the gun platform onto the rod. I epoxied them together, and once dry, trimmed the aluminum wire to the correct length. I re-measured the height against the bridge to mark where the ship's wheel would attach. I had to cut off the very thick piece of lead that was the attaching post and drill through it with a pin vice. I would use a straight pin with a rounded end to attach to the shaft. It was a tricky process, but I think I got it right, keeping the wheel straight and relatively parallel to the shaft.

I have a busy weekend planned, so likely won't get a lot more progress done. However, I do intend to paint the gear bead steel, and begin painting the wheel itself. Once they're painted, I'll epoxy them into place, as well. Thanks for all the kind comments, everyone!

Mike Demana
www.firstcommandwargames.com
http://leadlegionaries.blogspot.com/


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Dr Mathias
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« Reply #21 on: February 04, 2017, 06:00:28 PM »

This is perhaps the most opulent flying device to grace the skies.
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mikedemana
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« Reply #22 on: February 05, 2017, 01:12:07 AM »

Only the finest for Italy's budding colonial empire! 🇮🇹
 Laugh Laugh

Mike Demana
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« Reply #23 on: February 05, 2017, 08:32:59 AM »

Any way, it' ll be a shiny vessel.

Looks like a funcky disco transport. May be you can name it:  EWF 

For the crew uniforms, see here https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Gs069dndIYk

 Wink
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mikedemana
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« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2017, 03:26:33 AM »

A busy weekend kept me from making any more progress. But with the return of the workweek, I have been able to squeeze in an hour or two working on the Da Vinci flying machine each evening.


The ship's wheel (a purchase from a hobby shop), attach to a length of aluminum rod with beads

The first step was to assemble and attach the ship's wheel to the deck. Like with the powerstacks, I ended up using Tacky Glue to glue a metal washer onto the copper fabric. I considered cutting through the fabric to expose the steel deck of the bottle cap, but decided it was just as likely I'd end up tearing it and making a mess. The wheel should get very little stress near the middle of the main deck, so I decided to risk this attachment.


Measuring out the pewter paper that will decorate the cardboard outer ring

With the wheel's attachment, the middle part of the deck is finished. I could now begin work on the railing. I purchased Pewter colored paper from the hobby store to glue onto the black cardboard ring along the outer edge. I made a paper template to the correct size between the railing stanchions, and traced it out onto the pewter paper. I had to trim it a bit for each space, as my stanchions were eyeballed rather than measured for correct spacing. I painted the back of the paper with Tacky glue and then used the end of a paint brush to press it down. I was even able to slide the piece underneath the gangway bridge connecting the main deck to the gun deck.


Placing beads of glue where the rivets will go

Next up were the rivets for the pewter paper. You can't have Steampunk or Victorian Sci-Fi without rivets! Way back in the beginning, I'd purchased a package of 3mm Round Black Gemstones. It has hundreds more than I'll need, but I figured they would give a nice 3-dimensional look. I placed a bead of Tacky glue at each spot where a rivet would go. I used my old "tool" of a piece of thick piano wire with a tiny blob of bluetack on it to place each bead. A needle was used to nudge it into the right position and press it down onto the glue. The rivets underneath the gangway were only a tad trickier -- I was actually surprised how easy it was to move them into position.


My makeshift tool was the perfect thing to place each tiny gemstone onto its blob of glue

That's all -- a short update this time. Next up, I will string wire through the bead stanchions on the outer railing. I'm STILL holding off on starting the vanes of the aerial screw. I think I'm waiting for the ghost of Leonardo da Vinci to visit me and whisper an even better idea how to do them into my ear...!  Laugh


A section of the outer railing with beads all in place

Mike Demana
www.firstcommandwargames.com
http://leadlegionaries.blogspot.com/

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« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2017, 10:18:22 AM »

That last shot looks great!
 Love Love

Now I am trying to imagine the whole thing looking as baroque as that.
 Cheesy

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« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2017, 10:44:08 AM »


The bridge, which will have a helmsman steering the vessel with a ship's wheel

This is the best steampunk Tardis console ever.  Shocked
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« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2017, 12:15:18 PM »

Beautiful
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mikedemana
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« Reply #28 on: February 09, 2017, 03:46:50 AM »

Thanks, everyone! I appreciate the kind words. A bit of snow coming down, now. Secretly hoping for a snow day (like I'm sure my students are... Laugh). If so, expect me to begin on the vanes for the screw tomorrow. If not, oh well...expect deadline pressure to increase!

Mike Demana
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« Reply #29 on: February 10, 2017, 05:59:02 AM »

A few more updates. In light of the rules about painted bits, I'm zooming in quite a bit to show construction WIP photos, and not taking as many full model shots. I hope this complies with the rules -- please let me know if it doesn't!  Shocked


Brass wire runs through the stanchions to create an outer railing for the main base of the flyer

First off, I added the railing for the base. I took a piece of brass wire, bent it around a can to give it a rounded shape, and threaded it through the copper eyelets sticking out of the stanchions. I used a needle to add droplets of epoxy in each eyelet to help keep the brass wire in place. I had thought about adding a bead on either side of they eyelet for decoration, but decided to go with a relatively plain railing -- as plain as anything can be on this opulent vehicle!


A blurry shot of the bead decoration at the top of the shaft that will hold the vanes for the aerial screw

Next up, it was time to begin working on the central shaft piece that will hold the aerial screw vanes. I added a couple of wooden gears and a fancy bead to the top. Then, I painted the whole shaft Iron Wind Metals Steel. I picked out the gear cogs in copper. Next, I added some silver bands around the shaft. I liked the way the gemstone rivets looked on the main base, so decided to put some rivets on teh shaft as well. This turned out to take much less time than I thought it would. After gluing these on with Tacky glue, the shaft is essentially ready for the screw vanes.


I wanted more rivets on this vehicle, so I added some to the shaft that will hold the aerial screw vanes

The last bit of construction that needs to be done on the main base is the decoration along the bottom of the bottle cap. I'd mentioned earlier that I had an idea to trick it out and make it less "bottle cap looking." I trimmed the copper jewelry eyelets to size, and epoxied one in each of the indentations along the edge of the bottle cap. I did my best to keep them lined up and facing perpendicular. My intention is to run some wire -- probably brass here, as well -- through the eyelets.


The row of copper jewelry eyelets extending from the bottom edges of the bottle cap base. A wire will be threaded through the eyelets later

Finally, I cleaned up and primed the 15mm crew and gunner figures that will man the craft. At this point, I essentially have one week left to finish the build. If the aerial screw vanes go smoothly, I don't foresee problems in getting it finished. I do have a busy week next week, so I'll attempt to get as much done this weekend as possible.

I honestly am very excited to see how this thing will look when it is all completely finished... Love

Mike Demana
www.firstcommandwargames.com
http://leadlegionaries.blogspot.com/

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