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Author Topic: Primer for Resin?  (Read 8231 times)
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gauntman
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« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2008, 09:01:11 PM »

Huh, seems I'm the only one who uses regular old black acrylic paint applied by hand.

I have tons of resin scenery pieces.  It is usually a fairly time consuming process but I'm usually satisfied. 

I wonder if that means I'm missing out on something but I've always been real satisfied with it.   
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« Reply #16 on: June 03, 2008, 09:04:11 PM »

I think it is the experience of me and several others that water based paints, like acrylics, do not stick as well to resin as other, specialized paints. I'd say it has to do with the bonding medium and pigment granularity in acrylics which makes the difference.
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gauntman
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« Reply #17 on: June 04, 2008, 07:25:51 PM »

Wow that was a lot of big words.  OK so I'm behind the times.  I happened to be painting a coat on a cottage last night when I noticed a whole tiny piece of primer flake off.

It never occurred to me to wash resin before painting.

Oh well.  Maybe the many coats of paint sealant will compensate.

 Roll Eyes
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« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2008, 07:53:23 PM »

Hey, if you found a methods which works for you, power to you, my friend!  Smiley
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gauntman
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« Reply #19 on: June 04, 2008, 08:09:24 PM »

You guys guide and inspire me. Wink
I have for many years primed everything with black.

You fellows have encouraged me set aside a couple expendable figures to see how I like using grey and white primers.

I've always enjoyed the built-in shadowing that black provides but I'm curious about trying a few experiments with brighter colors.
 
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« Reply #20 on: June 04, 2008, 09:57:34 PM »

 Shocked You know what curiosity did to the cat, dontcha? It kilt it dead, that's what!
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gauntman
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« Reply #21 on: June 04, 2008, 11:41:03 PM »

OK everybody... as far as priming figures...

who uses what color?

black
white
grey

Just how much in the minority am I using black?
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Dewbakuk
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« Reply #22 on: June 04, 2008, 11:52:21 PM »

Depends what I'm painting.

If I'm doing something that will have predominantly light colours I'll use white. Most of the time I use black. Never tried grey but I know a few people who use it for vehicles.

My latest army is primed a dusky red as the dominant colour is red and it saves time when painting red as I don't need to worry about coverage too much.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2008, 09:19:34 AM by Dewbakuk » Logged

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« Reply #23 on: June 05, 2008, 03:13:10 AM »

I'm a black spray all the way man.

For very large scenery I'll brush on black.

I formerly used white, but switched about 15 years ago and haven't felt the need to go back.
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Wirelizard
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« Reply #24 on: June 05, 2008, 03:45:06 AM »

Grey, almost always. It's neutral, you can go light or dark over it.

I've used black in the past, but only on a few sets - got a 15mm orc/goblin army all done with black primer.
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Ramshackle_Curtis
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« Reply #25 on: August 01, 2008, 08:18:06 PM »

I always brush on my undercoat, as its more enviro friendly! Actually, thats a bit of a lie as I do use pray if Im feeling lazy. Any cheap matt grey primer will do the job, in the UK you can get it from Wilcos for less than a fiver....
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« Reply #26 on: August 01, 2008, 11:04:32 PM »

Quote
in the UK you can get it from Wilcos for less than a fiver....

sometimes, they have it in Poundland for less.................
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« Reply #27 on: March 03, 2009, 04:57:46 AM »

I know this is an older thread but since many people JUST read these for the info heres my 2 cents!

I have quite a lot of XP with resin primering and painting. I do my own casting, moldmaking, and have built my owm vacum chamber (for degassing "bubbles")

When you first get you Resin piece smell it! does it have a strong, mild, or week smell? Is it "sticky"? Resin pieces use to mixed conponets and as they cure they leach out gas. The stronger the smell the younger the piece or I should say Green, not yet fully curred! uncured pieces may have a problem keeping paint on so I would stick them in a dry, not cold, warm is better, light is better place for a week and recheck. I have had pieces by some casters that took a year to settle down! youmight wash it once before setting aside.

Most important is as preveious post said WASH/SCRUB dry WASH again! I an most caster use various mold release agents and their made to keep things from sticking. Get it off now or your paint will come off later!

I prime resin the same way I treat metal, with a GOOD quality fast drying automotive metal primer. You can do a test on a spot before the whole model to be safe.

Good luck.....
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« Reply #28 on: January 04, 2013, 12:19:43 AM »

Some resins don't take paint well - like trying to paint a bar of soap. The grey resin doesn't seem to be as sensitive as the butter colored resin.  I second Vonkluge & suspect some resin batches don't quite cure properly. I've experimented with every conceivable combination of acrylic or oil primers and washing in warm water, thinner, alcohol, and found that the primer still "lifts." Waiting time may be the key.  The best results of primer came from giving the resin models a quick rinse in Lacquer Thinner, then prime with Testors Lacquer Primer. Be really careful with lacquer thinner - it will melt plastic! and burn like gasoline.  Here in the US Krylon makes a primer formulated (shellac based?) for plastics which works pretty well.
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Ramshackle_Curtis
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« Reply #29 on: January 05, 2013, 10:06:28 AM »

Resin colour is not much of a guide, as a small amount of dye will change the colour from "buttery" to grey. Also, resin changes colour over time, especially if handled by a smoker. I kid you not!
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