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Miniatures Adventure => Age of Myths, Gods and Empires => Topic started by: Mad Doc Morris on October 12, 2015, 02:25:32 PM



Title: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 12, 2015, 02:25:32 PM
In 1977 at ancient Satricum (Central Italy) archaeologists unearthed a stone block bearing a dedication "of the companions of Poplios Valesios to Mars". Obviously these men were up to no good, as they sought the favour of the fearsome god of war quite possibly for a warlike venture. In their day and age, around 500 BC, warfare in Italy meant cattle raids, pillaging and abducting neighbours, preferably women come wives. All-out battles were still a very rare occasion, "big men" gathered their retinues rather for seasonal bashings, competing for individual glory and the next big haul. In fact, such actions make up the core of Roman mythology. For any wargamer with an interest in skirmish games set in the Ancients period stories like the battle of the Horatii, the Fabian attack on Veii or the defection of Coriolanus are pure gold.

So, over the next seven days I'll be posting my very own retinue of (very ancient) Roman ne'er-do-wells. First and foremost this is an opportunity to paint up a small number of great models from one of my favourite settings. A fun project inspired by the august memory of our first Seven Days of Antiquity (http://www.lead-adventure.de/index.php?topic=51058.0). No actual gaming might result from that, as to be expected from me. ;)

We start at the very top, of course: Poplios Valesios himself!

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1587_zpsca5foyea.jpg)

Whether he's to be identified with P. Valerius Poplicola, the legendary man who helped overthrowing the Etruscan kings of Rome, or not – during the 6th and 5th century BC Etruscan influence on Roman culture was still strong. This is reflected by Valesios' shield, bearing the face of χarun, a demon much nastier than his Greek namesake, the ferryman Charon.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1588_zpsdwcnvaww.jpg)

Like any erudite aristocrat Valesios also knows how to dress properly. Linen cuirass, a curved blade and greaves complete his Greek hoplite gear, the hallmark of truly civilised people. The masked helmet may be a concession to his less cultivated retainers. Well, the design is admittedly too late for 500 BC, since the range by Aventine is aimed rather at the 3rd century BC onwards. But I love the model too dearly.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1589_zpsi9svkr2k.jpg)

The season is almost over. Who will answer his call to arms? Stay tuned.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Prof.Witchheimer on October 12, 2015, 03:22:46 PM
Wow, wow  :o :-* What a painting job on the shield!
Love it, Doc, and love your idea of crossover with seven hills, well done :)


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: philhendry on October 12, 2015, 07:46:44 PM
That looks really great!


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: syrinx0 on October 12, 2015, 08:13:36 PM
A great start to the week.  Looking forward to the rest.  :)


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: jimbibbly on October 12, 2015, 08:28:13 PM
Excellent, the shield in particular  :-* :-*

cheers

James


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: S_P on October 13, 2015, 01:38:46 AM
Great work there


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Furt on October 13, 2015, 01:59:52 AM
WOW - just wow!!  :o  :-*  :o  :-*


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Tellus on October 13, 2015, 07:34:51 AM
Who sells this super duper shield decal  ;) :D
Gooood Job, Doc !



Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Denouement on October 13, 2015, 01:05:09 PM
Great detailing, I particularly like the three-toned helmet crest.  8) 8)

Stuart.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Phil Robinson on October 13, 2015, 02:41:04 PM
Splendid, a very nice sheen on the armour too.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Lagartija Mike on October 13, 2015, 03:06:21 PM
Beautiful work. The yarun is a great detail, if I ever put together an Etruscan army I'd like to give it a Tuchulcha standard, historical or otherwise, to go with the snake-brandishing priests.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Jeff965 on October 13, 2015, 03:25:23 PM
Lovely painting, more please  :-*


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 13, 2015, 03:33:10 PM
Many thanks for your comments, chaps! Glad you liked the start, hopefully the next one is not too much of a let-down.

Because Closus the Sabine has no money for fancy dress or equipment – not yet! Despite his name (meaning "lame") he's not only fleet of foot but his cleverness belies his brute appearance. Too young and too poor for military service Closus is eager to climb the social ladder quickly, and if this requires to smash in a few heads and loot a few corpses, so be it.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1601_zpsul0iayrn.jpg)

Before stealing cattle got separated from 'real warfare' there was little need for dedicated skirmishers (like the famous velites later on). Kids and young men who could defend a herd with mere sticks and stones were also able to drive off other herdsmen, perhaps even the occasional armoured one. And to prove oneself in such 'battles' was likely considered an initiation rite as well as an opportunity to grab some better equipment for next season.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1602_zpsk52ac7wq.jpg)

Again, a lovely model by Aventine. I particularly liked its determined pose and facial expression. Suits that single true Roman virtue: burning rapacity.

From top to bottom of early Roman society, tomorrow we'll begin to fill in the middle ground. And we'll return to fancy dress, promised! ;)


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Steve F on October 13, 2015, 07:51:45 PM
A sneaking resemblance to Grumio, there …

(http://i1079.photobucket.com/albums/w519/SteveFlanaganUK2/Odds%20and%20Ends/5284c7b84cca402729837805a5876142ad31b80313d5c516365f6bcd9e6b71f9_large_zpswix7hi5i.jpeg) (http://s1079.photobucket.com/user/SteveFlanaganUK2/media/Odds%20and%20Ends/5284c7b84cca402729837805a5876142ad31b80313d5c516365f6bcd9e6b71f9_large_zpswix7hi5i.jpeg.html)

Great project.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Steam Flunky on October 13, 2015, 08:50:28 PM
A sneaking resemblance to Grumio, there …

(http://i1079.photobucket.com/albums/w519/SteveFlanaganUK2/Odds%20and%20Ends/5284c7b84cca402729837805a5876142ad31b80313d5c516365f6bcd9e6b71f9_large_zpswix7hi5i.jpeg) (http://s1079.photobucket.com/user/SteveFlanaganUK2/media/Odds%20and%20Ends/5284c7b84cca402729837805a5876142ad31b80313d5c516365f6bcd9e6b71f9_large_zpswix7hi5i.jpeg.html)

Great project.
That is Angela Merkel


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: nikko on October 13, 2015, 09:59:05 PM
Hello,
Superb paintjob !!!
Nikko


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Captain Blood on October 13, 2015, 10:23:07 PM
Great work doc  :-*


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 14, 2015, 03:08:56 PM
Didn't think of "Plebs", but that's a striking resemblance indeed. lol

Anyway, upwards the social ladder again, if only a few scales. There we find Tiferios, a shopkeeper from just below the Aventine Hill. The prospering marketplace nearby (later to become known as the Forum Boarium) allows him to make a living from odds and ends for cattle traders and traveling merchants.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1605_zpsrdjpd9yr.jpg)

Economy is still pretty much based on barter in these early days. Hence Tiferios' fine bronze cuirass and his elaborate helmet may have been the proceeds of a few good deals. However, it's equally possible that he 'found' them in a neighbours house earlier this season…

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1603_zpsu7h96pac.jpg)

The much later classification of Roman citizens by their wealth first and their age close second may be the result of the very same process: Young men would gather experience and equipment from season to season, thereby progressing from mere skirmishers over light and increasingly heavy infantrymen until they were able to join the ranks of the highly specialised, Greek-style phalanx.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1606_zpsltejijh6.jpg)

We'll return to that tomorrow.
Oh, in case you didn't guess it, that's again a model by Aventine. ;)


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: DonVoss on October 14, 2015, 04:31:48 PM
What a wonderfull little project...
Great work all over.

Cheers,
Don


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Lt. Hazel on October 14, 2015, 08:10:26 PM
Opte! I really love your Project, the Choice of miniatures is cool and the paintjobs are splendid as usuall.
Cheers
Jan


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Lagartija Mike on October 15, 2015, 01:35:55 AM
I'm truly impressed. While I'm a partisan of the dingy realist school, this is great stuff.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mithridates1 on October 15, 2015, 09:01:38 AM
Great job, enjoying this thread very much.   Aventine make some impressive figures - have just ordered more of Volscians to flesh out a unit.  So your five o'clock shadow and overall paint scheme is very timely.  Thanks.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 15, 2015, 12:46:51 PM
Well, thanks for all your kind comments and for bearing with me. Another three to go, here's the fourth.

Coincidentally fourth son of a butcher, Maraius had little hope to inherit more than odd jobs in the family business. However, his father agreed to a friend's offer, who was childless and had asked to adopt one of the butcher's 'spare' sons. After some haggling Maraius was handed over to his new family, now designated heir to a small farm near the Aventine Hill. There's little diversion, just hard work, so Maraius is more than happy to answer the patron's call to arms. Hot-tempered but inexperienced he serves as a hastatus, a javelin-man.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1608_zpstdbiub2z.jpg)

Maraius' rectangular shield bears a viper, because his job is to sting the enemy and sneak away quickly. It may seem cumbersome, but it was likely adopted first by light troops to make up for a lack of body armour. In turn, other than heavy armour it is easily discarded if the enemy is in hot pursuit. Wolf pelt and bronze disks seen here are some kind of last resort, yet interestingly also protecting the warrior's back.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1611_zps1qxcpi9c.jpg)

Originally there was perhaps little difference between thrusting and throwing spears. So in advance of the introduction of specialised weaponry – like the pilum – the hasta (literally and related to "a goad") denoted just any kind pointy stick. In that era of hardly formalised warfare a warrior could also carry several sets of 'combat equipment'. Thus, while early Greek hoplites in heavy armour wouldn't refrain from hurling sticks and stones, Maraius is armed with sword and long spear as well.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1612_zpsf3aexkfj.jpg)

This was one of my favourite models to paint. I really like that overly dynamic pose. And, yes, these grass tufts need some redressing. ;)
Next up, one of Maraius' better-off relatives.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: philhendry on October 15, 2015, 01:32:35 PM
These are simply superb.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: bigredbat on October 15, 2015, 02:13:54 PM
Loving these!  Beautiful paint jobs.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Phil Robinson on October 15, 2015, 08:01:42 PM
And nicely turned out he is too, liking the vibrant colours a lot.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Smithy on October 16, 2015, 12:41:31 PM
Love what you're doing here, painting is superb. Just look at that javelin. Adam


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: pocoloco on October 16, 2015, 01:39:33 PM
Pure ancient awesomeness!  :o :-*

Can't wait to see the rest of companions.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: tancrede on October 16, 2015, 02:09:52 PM
Wonderful paintjob !  :-*
Clean, crisp and full of colors, just as I like...


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 16, 2015, 02:42:03 PM
So glad you're enjoying this tour de force. Thanks for taking the time to visit and comment! :)

Remember Maraius' new father, the farmer? He's too old for military service now, hence he's asked his brother-in-law, Ofetios, to keep an eye on the young lad while they're campaigning with Valesios. Ofetios is a livestock breeder, so he knows his ways around the woods and hills up and down the Tiber valley where his herds are pastured. That's also why he's a welcome guest in any warband going on a raid. Seriously, trade or raid, it's the same business for him.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1597_zpsyu8b6xpf.jpg)

Men in their prime are valued members of the Roman community. Therefore they're less likely to expose themselves in battle but will rather wait to support the skirmishers in close combat if more stubborn resistance is met. As farmers, traders or craftsmen they may lack extensive formal training or experience required to join the phalanx, so they continue to fight as up-armoured light infantry.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1598_zpsy5wj3hco.jpg)

Ofetios gear consists of several layers of armour: a white linen vest underneath (subarmalia), a quilted jerkin made of cloth or leather and pieces of scale armour to protect more delicate body parts. This is probably based on Etruscan wall paintings, and some may argue that the white straps (pteryges) were simply attached to the jerkin (and Smithy may have a final word here). But I simply wanted to add another colour here. The shield design is ripped off a decal by LBM (I'm a cheapskate).

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1599_zpsxdzuepyd.jpg)

In a much later period men like Ofetios would be called principes, "the first to be caught". If this referred to their role on the battlefield (the first to engage in 'the real deal' of close combat) or to the Roman taxation and recruitment system (whoever had the funds was expected to serve, so picked first), is all guesswork. Like everything presented here, of course.

Sorry for the small changes in colour, the camera really struggled with all those reddish tones. The slight sheen, in turn, may be due to the photos being taken right after varnishing's done. And close-ups are rather unforgiving. :'(

Aaaanyway, stay tuned for tomorrow.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: syrinx0 on October 16, 2015, 06:59:06 PM
I gather you work on the narrative to bring the figure to life while painting?  Nice work on both btw.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Prof.Witchheimer on October 16, 2015, 07:05:51 PM
Yes, absolutely enjoying tour de force, Doc, love the stories, the characters and all the little detais like the check pattern on the helmet of Ofetios.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Argonor on October 16, 2015, 09:14:38 PM
Cracking painting, and the background stories really make the characters come to life!

Anticipating the next one!


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: philhendry on October 17, 2015, 12:34:22 AM
He looks great - of course! Which pack is he from?


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 18, 2015, 02:59:25 AM
Many thanks all!
Quite embarrassing to know some people read my nonsense. lol Please don't expect a full story arc, I make these up as I go along. After this and the last one it might become clear why I chose this variety of figures in particular.
Speaking of individuals, Phil, the last one was from ETR007 – kindly provided by Aventine on special order. Kudos!

We've certainly gathered by now: There's always need for capable and willing warriors in ancient Italy. The urban and tribal communities are more or less constantly at war with each other, and if they don't have enough manpower, surely some neighbours will gladly offer their services. Warbands are rambling up and down the Apennine Peninsula, frequently joined by Celts from across the Alps or Greeks and Carthaginians from Sicily. Mamerce the Etruscan hails from Veii, just a few miles to the north of Rome. Both cities share a cordial long-term hostility and thereby established an almost regular exchange of men taken prisoner in battle. It's not unusual for these 'hostages' to become valued members of the their 'host's' household and thus fellow citizens of their former enemies.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1594_zpsaywsxu8n.jpg)

Mamerce serves Valesios as a bodyguard, one of the few truly professional soldiers at Rome. His equipment, including fine lamellar armour, was likely a gift in order to bring him up to the standards (and wealth) required to join the Roman phalanx alongside his patron. It is very likely that, for the most part, Roman super-heavy hoplite infantry appeared on the battlefield only to look impressive and menacing. Eye-catching head-gear like a set of feathers mentioned (much later) by Polybius was perhaps one measure, so I painted them here in striking red. The shield design is inspired by Peter Connolly's depiction of Etruscan hoplites.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1595_zpszrrta5dv.jpg)

Tomorrow (or later today rather) I'll wrap this up with a special figure. A final group shot might (!) follow next week or so.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Phil Robinson on October 18, 2015, 03:25:14 AM
Superb, and an excellent finish on that spearshaft.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: pocoloco on October 18, 2015, 09:11:03 AM
Yet another stunning character!  :-*

Tomorrow (or later today rather) I'll wrap this up with a special figure. A final group shot might (!) follow next week or so.

No, it can't be over yet!!!  :o What about their rivals? The cattle they rustle, so to speak? Their family members, next door neighbours... ;)


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Lt. Hazel on October 18, 2015, 10:07:03 AM
This is the most beautifull in the bunch so far. Gorgeous work on the shield.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: nikko on October 18, 2015, 01:10:09 PM
Hello,
Great paintjob on this nice Avantine miniature.
Nikko


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: philhendry on October 18, 2015, 04:04:26 PM
Sickeningly brilliant painting. Time for me to give up wargaming and take up tiddlywinks.

Thanks for the info on the figure… Now I know where to look on the Aventine site!


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 18, 2015, 04:40:49 PM
Many thanks, guys! Mamerce is one of my favourites as well, not the least because hoplite shields are a great surface to paint on.

Now that all the different classes from hoplite to skirmisher are present, there's one thing remaining. A good handful of warriors make up a decent raiding party. But in battle they easily are scattered, so 'command & control' is vital. Valesios has chosen young Vestrikius, nephew of Tiferios, to be his second-in-command and to carry the companionship's hallowed standard – some say, for no other reason than being "closely related" to the patron somehow. Roman aristocrats usually ignore such detractors who clearly have no sense for Greek refinement…

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1591_zpsgdousoq2.jpg)

Particularly un-Greek seems the use of standards in general. Fighting almost exclusively in close order formations hoplites don't really need visual rallying points. More lightly equipped warriors, though, may disperse and form up again as the situation requires, and thus standards are probably more useful for the kind of flowing combat that prevails in early Italy. In all likelihood Roman formations were never that complex. Warriors come soldiers would rather bunch up in mobs, watching their comrades in front (not unlike a theatre performance) and waiting for their own next turn.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1592_zpsgi8k92mu.jpg)

Since the standard constitutes a unit in battle, it may become a symbol of the unit's identity as well. The bull seen here is a rather common symbol, possibly derived from folk etymology which interlinked "Italia" with "bull (calf)" in several languages (e.g. Latin (v)itellus). Another totemistic item may be the pelt armour traditionally ascribed to Roman standard bearers. Perhaps it was also an appropriately "ancient" looking garment. Or perhaps it was lightweight enough not encumber its wearer in case he had to safe the standard by simply running off. Only to tell the people at home about the great deeds of their fathers, brothers and husbands, of course.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/Poliorketes/Tabletop/Ancients%20Week%20II/IMG_1593_zpsqsw8rm4r.jpg)

And so this little story comes to an end as well. No promises if and when this will be resumed. Like said, it's been a fun project first and foremost.

At this point, huge thanks to Aventine Miniatures are in order: They kindly agreed to help me out on this with special orders of individually picked models. That's a very rare service these days, and I'm happy to commend them not only for that, but also for all the research that went into this range. Hats off to Keith and Adam!

Finally, thanks to you all for your company and comments this week. If you feel inspired to share your work here on LAF, whatever the format, my mission's accomplished. :)


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Steam Flunky on October 18, 2015, 05:38:52 PM
Great thread.
Aventine ancients are super and your painting really does them justice!


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: philhendry on October 18, 2015, 06:02:08 PM
Not another! On the same day. Order for Tiddlywinks has now gone in...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0013HHD2M?keywords=tiddlywinks&qid=1445184059&ref_=sr_1_3&sr=8-3 (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0013HHD2M?keywords=tiddlywinks&qid=1445184059&ref_=sr_1_3&sr=8-3)

Seriously impressed with your painting.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: commissarmoody on October 19, 2015, 02:02:32 AM
Very cool


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Nevyen on October 19, 2015, 09:11:47 AM
Mad Doc ,  make a small warband! i think you could even use a modified lion rampart for some italian hill tribe type skirmish game !

Such awesome models I love your work !


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Denouement on October 19, 2015, 09:28:15 AM
Very impressed. 8)

Stuart.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Captain Blood on October 19, 2015, 10:54:15 AM
The standard bearer is my favourite  :-*


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Ragnar on October 19, 2015, 10:56:27 AM
What a great little project!  I agree: keep going!


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome (final shot)
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 19, 2015, 11:49:07 AM
Thanks all! :)
However, you really should quit while you're ahead. So there are no plans for anything beyond this mad week's assembly. It was a fun exercise, but Early Rome is definitely a special interest.

In order to avoid hard feelings, here's a parting shot of the full array in my usual setup.

(http://www.lead-adventure.de/gallery/23/1034_19_10_15_11_16_10.jpg)

Well, must have been a very dry Italian summer. ;)


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Nevyen on October 19, 2015, 11:58:48 AM
Mate I love your skin tones and faces,  I feel that's where I struggle most of the time. If the mood ever takes you I would love a tutorial or even the colors you use and the paint recipes :)



Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 19, 2015, 12:28:40 PM
Nevyen, quick answer 'cause it's very easy: I use Foundry's "Mediterranean Flesh" almost exclusively these days. It gives a nicely tanned skin tone, and the three colours are usable straight from the pot. Additional highlights are put on with Foundry's "Expert Flesh D" (or any light, "Elven" skin colour). I apply a reddish wash in-between, but mostly after the four flesh colours, just for blending them all together; "Reikland Fleshshade" by Games Workshop is a good option. Bring back some highlights, perhaps adding any bone/light sand colour, and it's done.
Hope that helps. A full, illustrated tutorial is too time-consuming at the moment, unfortunately.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Nevyen on October 19, 2015, 01:00:13 PM
That's very helpful indeed !


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Lagartija Mike on October 20, 2015, 11:32:38 PM
First class work. It's a shame you won't be expanding them. Inspirational anyhow (I'm backlogged with painting/modding as it is but this ..along with the Gorgon Etruscan Chariot...is telling me to get in deeper).


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Captain Blood on October 20, 2015, 11:35:21 PM
And a lovely group they are  :-*
Well done Mad Doc.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: tancrede on October 21, 2015, 11:06:07 AM
Wondeful paintjob !  :-* :-* :-*
And the group looks very good.

I hope to see more of your work on those ancients soon...


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: verd on October 21, 2015, 02:08:42 PM
Great stuff; really good!  :-*


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: rumacara on October 21, 2015, 04:44:26 PM
Wow!! :-* :-*
Very well painted.
More please.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: WillieB on October 21, 2015, 05:30:42 PM
Wonderfully atmospheric!
It's without a doubt one of the nicest looking war-bands I've seen since a long time.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: nikko on October 21, 2015, 06:54:09 PM
Hello,
Superb paintjob !!! :-* :-*
Thanks for flesh colors used...
Nikko


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: bigredbat on October 21, 2015, 07:02:40 PM
Those are absolutely splendid!  Very well done.  :-)


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Phil Robinson on October 21, 2015, 08:36:13 PM
Good to see them all together, a splendid ensemble indeed.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 22, 2015, 08:57:37 AM
Again, thank you all for your comments, much appreciated! :)

If anyone's enticed to paint a complementing warband, go for it! For a number of reasons I won't be able to add something soon (or at all). But that's not to stop someone else to pick up this or a similar topic.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Aaron on October 22, 2015, 01:36:21 PM
What a treat this thread is! Thank you Doc for sharing with us. I have many of those figures languishing unpainted in my lead mountain somewhere I believe. I think a Lion Rampant variant warband might be in order for me.

Do you have any reading suggestions for this very early period of Roman history?


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 22, 2015, 02:59:53 PM
Aaron, most things I've read are in German, so perhaps of little use to you? For a pretty decent introduction and some advice on further reading you might take a look at Ancient Warfare Magazine issues IV.1 (Pre-Roman Italy) and VII.3 (Early Roman Republic).


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Prof.Witchheimer on October 22, 2015, 03:06:22 PM
That group shot is splendid, Doc, very well photographed. Could be a lovely potential team for LPL :)


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Lagartija Mike on October 22, 2015, 07:47:43 PM
@Aaron: Cornell's The Beginnings of Rome and Forsythe's A Critical History of Early Rome make a solid introduction.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Aaron on October 22, 2015, 07:56:34 PM
Thanks Doc. I actually own and have read both of those issues and agree that they are a great starting point. I should probably go back and see if those articles have bibliographies!  I also have quite a few books on the Etruscans, so maybe I should just bust out the figures and get to painting.  lol

The last issue (80) of Wargames, Soldiers, and Strategy has First Punic War lists for Roman and Carthaginian forces for Lion Rampant. I know it is a much later period, but it should make a good starting point for anyone interested in an excuse to paint up some of the great Aventine figures.

Thanks Mike. Amazingly I don't think I have either one of those books in my library.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: jimbibbly on October 22, 2015, 07:57:17 PM
A great little collection  :-* :-* :-*

A shame you're not able to add to it though  :(

cheers

James


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 23, 2015, 11:20:18 AM
Ah well, forgot Forsythe's account, read it years ago. Like its title suggests, it is a lesson in skepticism. Based on reviews Cornell seems to provide the opposite approach; haven't read it 'cause there are similar studies in German.

Regarding gaming and rules: Lion Rampant is a neat little system, but even if it's not that period-specific I'm not a fan of retrofitting other periods into existing sets. Also, given my glacial painting speed I could hardly manage the required number of minis per unit. Actually, I find serial painting less and less enjoyable – not the least because the resulting 'big skirmish' games experienced so far felt always somewhat… bland? Seem to prefer either the grandezza of battles or roleplaying with individual models.

Alex, seriously, that would've been my one single entry for LPL. Now it's spoilt anyway. lol


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: archiduque on October 23, 2015, 12:54:56 PM
Fantastic work!! :-*


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: nervisfr on October 25, 2015, 01:43:02 PM
MAGNIFIQUE !

what a group !

Splendid paintjob !  :-*


We want more !

cheers
Eric


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Lagartija Mike on October 25, 2015, 06:01:28 PM
Actually, MadDoc, I think Cornell is more hostile to traditional historiography than Forsythe.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Mad Doc Morris on October 25, 2015, 06:42:02 PM
archiduque & nervisfr, thanks! :)

Lagartija Mike, then I should give it a read perhaps. Like said, relied on reviews.


Title: Re: Seven Hills – A Week of Very Ancient Rome
Post by: Steam Flunky on October 25, 2015, 06:58:24 PM
Beautiful, :-*
i had a similar problem.
I painted a handfull of the lovely Aventine italian hill tribe miniatures and they turned out even better than i hoped, but as i had a load of half painted 15mm ancients laying around i knew it would be silly to start a whole army of 28mm.