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Author Topic: Russian Uniforms in Central Asia  (Read 15322 times)
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Gluteus Maximus
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« Reply #15 on: October 31, 2009, 10:25:55 AM »

That's a great pic, Stephane. Thanks fo posting it  Cheesy
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tom_aargau
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« Reply #16 on: October 31, 2009, 11:31:48 AM »

Second that, great picture.

Osprey 241 Russian Army of the Crimean War has a picture of of a sergeant of the 33rd Moskovski Regiment in red pants. The text says that the pants were obtained in the Caucasus and worn by both the Moscow and Butyrski regiments.

Seems to confirm what was remarked before that the red pants were locally made and purchased.
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Sterling Moose
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« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2009, 04:04:33 AM »

Here are some great paintings of the period by a Russian called Karazin:








Google search images 'Karazin' and it will give the Russian Wikipedia page as a link.  you can zoom right in on the Wiki versions - the level of detail is exceptional.
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Sterling Moose
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« Reply #18 on: November 02, 2009, 04:14:18 AM »

Here are some pics from various sources:

1869


1869


1873


1873




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Will Bailie
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« Reply #19 on: November 02, 2009, 06:24:25 AM »

Wow, Stephane and Sterling, thanks for the great artwork.  Now I am going to have to re-direct my figure collecting!  (that's the problem with learning things, you can't just let your preconceived ideas continue once you find out how wrong they were)

Looks like I'll be contacting Askari and/or Outpost for appropriate figures now.

Cheers!

W
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Gluteus Maximus
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« Reply #20 on: November 02, 2009, 10:35:40 AM »

Yes, thanks to you also, Mr Moose.

These are wonderful Colonial resources on an obscure subject  Cheesy
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aecurtis
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« Reply #21 on: November 24, 2009, 02:44:36 PM »

Possibly the red trousers were intended for a specific campaign, as was British practice with the various campaign-specific uniforms prior to the general adoption of  standardised khaki? Ditto the cap and havelock, although they wore both peaked cap and kepi in the Russo-Turkish war, so maybe a mixture was possible. Maybe the white tunic and green trousers combo was the usual hot weather dress within the Russian territory?

I'm hoping someone more knowledgable can give us a definitive answer as I'm also intrigued by this question now  Smiley

Sorry that I'm just catching up on this thread.  Yes, the kepi was in the process of being replaced by the furashka (a Pan-Slavic effort!) during the Russo-Turkish War, and was completely replaced after the end of the war.  But the kepi with havelock remained in use in Turkestan for some years.  For example, the 1882 edition of "The Armed Strength of Russia" indicates that the furashka was the common undress headgear, but notes the special uniforms for Turkestan on page 118:

http://books.google.com/books?id=HqABAAAAQAAJ&dq=armed+strength+of+russia&printsec=frontcover&source=bl&ots=06xXFB4FCB&sig=Udlx_Ef4so8wVz_bUQM8ci5qmfA&hl=en&ei=ueALS4r8JYH8tQPf4sSiAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CAgQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=&f=false

I would have to go through the filing cabinet and all my copies of later copies of "The Armed Strength of Russia" to be sure, but if I recall correctly, the kepi drops out of use in about 1885.  That was the year I had targeted for a fictional campaign; I remember painting up some Frontier Boxer Rebellion Russian troops in furashka, giving them red chambars!

Allen
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huevans
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« Reply #22 on: November 24, 2009, 04:00:48 PM »

The uppermost Karazin picture is of the Fall of Samarkand. Wiki gives the date of this event as being 1868. The other pictures do however indicate that the uniform was retained into the 1880's.
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Gluteus Maximus
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« Reply #23 on: November 24, 2009, 04:27:11 PM »

Sorry that I'm just catching up on this thread.  Yes, the kepi was in the process of being replaced by the furashka (a Pan-Slavic effort!) during the Russo-Turkish War, and was completely replaced after the end of the war.  But the kepi with havelock remained in use in Turkestan for some years.  For example, the 1882 edition of "The Armed Strength of Russia" indicates that the furashka was the common undress headgear, but notes the special uniforms for Turkestan on page 118:

http://books.google.com/books?id=HqABAAAAQAAJ&dq=armed+strength+of+russia&printsec=frontcover&source=bl&ots=06xXFB4FCB&sig=Udlx_Ef4so8wVz_bUQM8ci5qmfA&hl=en&ei=ueALS4r8JYH8tQPf4sSiAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CAgQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=&f=false

I would have to go through the filing cabinet and all my copies of later copies of "The Armed Strength of Russia" to be sure, but if I recall correctly, the kepi drops out of use in about 1885.  That was the year I had targeted for a fictional campaign; I remember painting up some Frontier Boxer Rebellion Russian troops in furashka, giving them red chambars!

Allen


Thanks, Allen! That's a great help.

"Furashka" - that's the name of the cap that I was trying remember  Cheesy
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Will Bailie
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« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2009, 10:27:37 AM »

I received my 1877 Russkis on Tuesday, and here is the first test figure, along with a Redoubt Russki for size comparison.  It was easy enough to fit the havelock onto the kepi.  The Outpost fellows are noticeably shorter than Redoubt's, but then so are many figures.  (and it doesn't help that the Outpost fellow is leaning forward)  They are also smaller than the Perrys, but it don't bother me as they will be in searate units.  Outpost paint up very easily - I will enjoy getting these guys ready for table and will definitely be ordering more.  Jeff is great to do business with!



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Gluteus Maximus
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« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2009, 01:35:40 PM »

The look fine together as far as I'm concerned. The heads and rifles are approx the same size, which always helps figures look "in scale".  I'd agree probably keep in separate units, but I'd have no problems using them in the same game  Cheesy
« Last Edit: December 29, 2009, 11:09:13 AM by Gluteus Maximus » Logged
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« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2009, 04:30:01 PM »

Cheers, Gluteus.  It's not so obvious in these photos, but the two figures have different equipment on their backs.  That will show up more than the size difference.  At any rate, it should be obvious that the ones with white coats are the Russians (as the British and Indians wear khaki, the Afghan regulars are in brown and the Pathans are, well, everyone else).
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starkadder
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« Reply #27 on: December 29, 2009, 11:00:51 AM »

A source with no authority but a wonderful film is Akira Kurosawa's Dersu Uzala. The officer is an army surveyor and the film is set in the early 1900s in Siberia.

It's a truly great film with no pulp or wargaming potential. And that, sometimes, is a good thing. 
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« Reply #28 on: January 21, 2010, 09:30:55 PM »

If you like a slightly earlier look consider the expanding range from Outpost Wargames Service of Russians for the 1877-1878 Russo Turkish war, check out their own listing or for information about forthcoming releases check out the Greens photo file on the Yahoo Russo Turkish wars group.

Caucasian cossack foot, Ural cossack foot and Russian artillery crews are all due for release between Jan/Feb 2010 also coming out are Guard conversions of the existing line.

Regards,

Geoff

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« Reply #29 on: September 08, 2010, 06:40:21 PM »

Just received shipments from Eureka and Askari, and here is a comparison with Outpost.  All figures are Russians from RTW Era (ca 1877)





From left to right, the figures are Eureka, Askari and Outpost, plus a Perry British infantryman for comparison.  All figures are close enough for me to use them together.  Personally, I like the Eureka models the best.  Askari figures are definitely improving from their first offerings, and I'm looking forward to painting these.  Askari uses a brittle metal, however - I have a couple of rifles that broke when I tried to straighten them out.

I'll eventually get around to painting these and will post the results then.
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